Photo-features helped publish a story in the Sunday Express about the demolition of a historic Jetty which has historic links to Admiral Lord Nelson. If you have a campaign close to your heart which you think has national interest please contact Photo-Features today and we could help you get the publicity you need. Read the full story below:

A SEASIDE pier captured in iconic paintings by two of the world’s most famous artists is to be knocked down.
The pier, thought to be one of the oldest in Britain, inspired artists because of its association with Lord Nelson and his famous battles.

Now the jetty, built in 1560 at Great Yarmouth in Norfolk and painted by John Constable and JMW Turner, is set to be demolished.

Council bosses have said they can’t find the £300,000 needed to refurbish it. Residents claim the decision would have Nelson turning in his grave. Kirsty Cater, 31, said: “We are so fortunate to have this piece of history on our doorstep. To think those famous artists were inspired enough to capture it in the way they did is incredible and now we’ve got to see it knocked down.

“Nelson would be horrified. It was used to service the great warships. It’s thought of around here as his jetty. How can we just knock down a piece of history?” The council voted last week to demolish the pier after English Heritage refused to award it listed status.

Residents claim the decision would have Nelson turning in his grave
The jetty was rebuilt in 1701 and 1767 after suffering sea damage. In 1791 it was nearly swept away by a freak high tide and just about survived another battering in 1805, the year of Trafalgar. As it was thought to the warships the then vast sum of £5,000 was spent to save it. As the sea ­receded it was lengthened by 60ft in 1846 and 1870.

Since then it has become a popular spot for walkers and fishermen. The council approved demolition with the caveat that a monument be put up to mark the spot.

Committee chairman Charles Reynolds told the meeting: “Everyone in this room is sad at having to make the decision but there is not the money available to refurbish it. Sometimes you have to put the old dog down.”
Photo-features helped publish a story in the Sunday Express about the demolition of a historic Jetty which has historic links to Admiral Lord Nelson. If you have a campaign close to your heart which you think has national interest please contact Photo-Features today and we could help you get the publicity you need. Read the full story below:

A SEASIDE pier captured in iconic paintings by two of the world’s most famous artists is to be knocked down.
The pier, thought to be one of the oldest in Britain, inspired artists because of its association with Lord Nelson and his famous battles.

Now the jetty, built in 1560 at Great Yarmouth in Norfolk and painted by John Constable and JMW Turner, is set to be demolished.

Council bosses have said they can’t find the £300,000 needed to refurbish it. Residents claim the decision would have Nelson turning in his grave. Kirsty Cater, 31, said: “We are so fortunate to have this piece of history on our doorstep. To think those famous artists were inspired enough to capture it in the way they did is incredible and now we’ve got to see it knocked down.

“Nelson would be horrified. It was used to service the great warships. It’s thought of around here as his jetty. How can we just knock down a piece of history?” The council voted last week to demolish the pier after English Heritage refused to award it listed status.

Residents claim the decision would have Nelson turning in his grave
The jetty was rebuilt in 1701 and 1767 after suffering sea damage. In 1791 it was nearly swept away by a freak high tide and just about survived another battering in 1805, the year of Trafalgar. As it was thought to the warships the then vast sum of £5,000 was spent to save it. As the sea ­receded it was lengthened by 60ft in 1846 and 1870.

Since then it has become a popular spot for walkers and fishermen. The council approved demolition with the caveat that a monument be put up to mark the spot.

Committee chairman Charles Reynolds told the meeting: “Everyone in this room is sad at having to make the decision but there is not the money available to refurbish it. Sometimes you have to put the old dog down.”